Schedule

The conference will feature six thematic session tracks, with 60+ presentations by industry leaders; optional pre- and post-conference half-day intensive workshops; outstanding keynotes; and a number of social and networking events.

Sunday, October 6

11:00
AM –
6:00
PM
Registration (Lobby)
d84e4a05-eb31-4748-a952-1b806d9bb056@2013.highedweb.org 20131006T11000020131006T180000
12:00
1:00
PM
Lunch (for Workshop Attendees and Presenters) (Exhibit Hall)
231b703b-b583-417a-9060-ce0712da5641@2013.highedweb.org 20131006T12000020131006T130000
1:00
4:30
PM
Workshops
A Nuts-and-Bolts Introduction to Client-side Interactivity with jQuery and AJAX
A Nuts-and-Bolts Introduction to Client-side Interactivity with jQuery and AJAX (WRK1)Today's website consumers demand a tremendous amount of flexibility, responsiveness and interactivity. People have become used to Web applications like Facebook, GMail and Twitter which make heavy use of Web browser client-side programming in JavaScript and interaction with Web services using the AJAX programming model. This workshop will teach you the basics of Web browser client-side programming using Web standards. We'll take a quick tour of HTTP, DOM, Javascript, XML and JSON, then jump in with hands-on exercises using the jQuery Javascript library, building up an interactive website utilizing AJAX Web services. This year's session will closely resemble 2012's successful model, with different exercises. You should come prepared with a laptop, your favorite text editor and the latest version of the Chrome Web browser. Before the conference we'll also provide a list of Chrome extensions you'll need to install. A familiarity with JavaScript, DOM, HTML, CSS and some client-side programming is necessary for this session.Room 106A20131006T13000020131006T163000Jason Woodward (RecoVend, Inc.)
Building a WordPress Theme
Building a WordPress Theme (WRK2)On first glance, the WordPress theme API can look like a large, unwieldy beast but with that size and scale comes an unparalleled flexibility. During this workshop, Curtiss Grymala will provide a brief primer on the WordPress theme API, then work with participants to convert a basic HTML template into a full-featured WordPress theme.Room 106B20131006T13000020131006T163000Curtiss Grymala (University of Mary Washington)
Can Has Graphics? Infographics and Animated Video for Beginners
Can Has Graphics? Infographics and Animated Video for Beginners (WRK3)In our workshop, we will work with anyone (artsy people, web geeks, newbies, trained monkeys, untrained monkeys, your grandma, etc.) and give you some easy tips and tricks to creating infographics and animated video for your Web content. You don't need experience to join in, but some of the following might come in handy if you want to dig in with us: - video editing software (Adobe Premiere, Final Cut, Camtasia, etc.) - photo editing software (Adobe Photoshop) - MS Office - opposable thumbs.  Our Personal Guarantee: If you are not fully satisfied with this session, we will alter the space-time continuum to give you your day back.Room 101F20131006T13000020131006T163000Nikki Massaro Kauffman (Penn State World Campus), John "Buck" Buckwalter (Penn State World Campus)
Developing and Maintaining Web Content: An Idea Generating Workshop
Developing and Maintaining Web Content: An Idea Generating Workshop (WRK4)This popular HighEdWeb workshop is a great way to start off the conference! Using some of the cornerstone topics in communications and public relations, this workshop examines the development of good Web content. The second half of the workshop looks at research techniques available for developing and assessing websites.Room 101B20131006T13000020131006T163000Douglas Tschopp (Augustana College)
Google Analytics 101, 302 and 404
Google Analytics 101, 302 and 404 (WRK5)Google Analytics has become the dominant web analytics tool in higher ed. It’s a free, robust and extremely valuable tool. While Google Analytics is built with an easy-to-use interface, underneath is a powerful and productive engine that when properly tuned can yield valuable insights. In this workshop, Seth Meranda will explore the Google Analytics engine and provide you with the knowledge needed to finely-tune your institution's analytics setup. Seth will review the tracking process and explore opportunities to adjust and enhance your current tracking. In addition, Seth will review best practices and share tips and tricks he’s found from his work with institutions across the country. Next, Seth will dive deep into the reporting environment by focusing on squeezing actionable insights from the data. Seth will explain the importance and usefulness of the “web analytics bookends”: campaign tagging and goals. In addition, Seth will explore the ins-and-outs of the standard reports and the setup of advanced segments, dashboards and custom reports. Finally, Seth will showcase advanced use cases to take your web analytics strategy even farther: multi-channel funnels, universal analytics, adwords, experiments and more.Room 101C20131006T13000020131006T163000Seth Meranda (University of Nebraska-Lincoln)
Ultimate HighEdWeb Growth Opportunity
Ultimate HighEdWeb Growth Opportunity (WRK6)Interested in learning more about a variety of topics very important in today's higher education marketplace? If so, this is the workshop for you. Simply put, a line-up of expert presenters will offer their insights and advice on a series of topics that will prime you for your HighEdWeb conference experience. So, whether you are a beginner or seeking more knowledge, you will find it here. Our presenters will share information about: Higher education web and marketing strategy - knowing the competition, the value of brand research, planning and utilization of an institutional brandThe mobile web and responsive design - what everyone should know, why it's important and how it worksSocial media ins and outs - tips and tricks to manage, experience and engageContent strategy and the value of strong content - how to get your campus moving forward while navigating any campus politicsRoom 101G20131006T13000020131006T163000Doug Gapinski (mStoner), Peter Anglea (Bob Jones University), Georgy Cohen (Suffolk University), Lougan Bishop (Belmont University)
2:30
3:00
PM
Refreshment Break (Ballroom)
c1b30465-c2b0-4702-b5b4-e4729929634c@2013.highedweb.org 20131006T14300020131006T150000
5:00
6:00
PM
Conference Welcome and Orientation Session (Exhibit Hall)
fa78c708-10d7-4011-becb-153ff10e6ce2@2013.highedweb.org 20131006T17000020131006T180000
6:15
9:00
PM
Welcome Reception (Pearl Street Grill and Brewery, 76 Pearl St.)
e2451b01-79e0-4526-b215-0918723ca004@2013.highedweb.org Welcome ReceptionWe kick off the 2013 conference in true Buffalo style at the Pearl Street Grill & Brewery. Join us for music, games, and food that is a unique taste of the Queen City.20131006T18150020131006T210000

Monday, October 7

Applications, Integration and Mobile Management and Professional Development Marketing, Content, and Social Strategy Technical: Propeller Hats Required Technology in Education Usability, Accessibility and Design Sponsors
7:00
8:30
AM
Breakfast, sponsored by Acquia (Exhibit Hall)
de1c9078-62d2-4102-84e4-9a25dd8457b7@2013.highedweb.org 20131007T07000020131007T083000
7:30
AM –
3:00
PM
Registration (Lobby)
f0dba06a-ddb2-4efe-9fe0-8082d0aecac5@2013.highedweb.org 20131007T07300020131007T150000
8:30
9:15
AM
I invited a Geek to the dance and loved it: Collaboration unlocks the information hidden in our data
I invited a Geek to the dance and loved it: Collaboration unlocks the information hidden in our data (AIM1)The days of the computer person, tech person and web person all being the same person neatly tucked in the corner with their toys are becoming a thing of the past. In this session, Donald R. Malone will discuss how insight gained over years of experience and a collaborative mind set within Student Affairs has helped applications for student programming successfully move from a paper to a digital process. Malone will share how real time data streams allow directors and program assistants to monitor ongoing applications and interview processes and make informed decisions concerning future planning. From data dashboards that include charts and graphs for visual learners to grading rubrics customized for handheld devices to assist in standardization, features in this project and many like it have allowed the Division to realize savings in more than one area. Each new project provides an opportunity to collaborate or “chance to dance.” New features born of that opportunity help the Division as a whole, with technology serving as the common thread between each department. Room 101F20131007T08300020131007T091500Donald R. Malone (The University of Alabama)
Make It Work? A Primer on the Client Services Approach in Higher Ed
Make It Work? A Primer on the Client Services Approach in Higher Ed (MPD1)Charge back? What’s the charge-back model? Much of higher education’s web work is done on a client-services basis, where departments do not know the actual cost of their wish list. What’s more, they don’t know how the work (and providers) are impacted when they miss deadlines, ignore requests, or change their ever-loving minds 20 times in the process. This presentation will focus on how to make your stakeholders realize what their behaviors truly mean to the bottom line. We’ll talk about establishing a process for engaging client-services providers and how to make your work have real value in stakeholders’ eyes. We’ll also talk about establishing real-life consequences that won’t leave you sputtering or without a job. You’ll emerge with a new approach to problem solving in higher education. And greater sanity. You’ll learn how to make it work for your stakeholders – and you first.Room 106B20131007T08300020131007T091500Tonya Oaks Smith (UALR William H. Bowen School of Law)
Web Content Migration: The Good, The Bad And The Ugly
Web Content Migration: The Good, The Bad And The Ugly (MCS1)Anne Edmondson, Web Marketing Director at Regis University in Denver, CO, will present successes earned and lessons learned from the recent migration of the University's 7,000+ page website to a new user interface, design, information architecture and content management system. Edmondson will share experiences and offer free advice on launching a new website to internal community stakeholders such as faculty, administrators and students.Room 101C20131007T08300020131007T091500Anne Edmondson (Regis University)
Managing Your CSS Development with Sass and Compass
Managing Your CSS Development with Sass and Compass (TPR1)Imagine being able to structure your CSS by nesting rules within one another, to make macros to replicate reusable code and even to specify a color in one place while using it throughout your stylesheet. You can do all this with a CSS management language called Sass. We'll do a deep dive into its capabilities, show you how to integrate it into your existing CSS workflow, and explore the Compass library of reusable CSS components.Room 101G20131007T08300020131007T091500Jason Woodward (RecoVend, Inc.)
The Great Unbundling
The Great Unbundling (TIE1)Higher Education is getting flattened which is defined as “when the impact of the Internet and globalization render an industry unrecognizable, and in many cases, obsolete.” Globalization 3.0, the arrival of the technically adept Millennial Generation, and the ongoing Communications Revolution has created a perfect storm that will forever change the college campus. Core functions are quickly becoming unbundled, which will completely change higher education’s fundamental business model. Campuses that don’t adapt face the real prospect of obsolescence. A complete paradigm shift will be required, and as higher education moves from a vertically integrated model to a horizontal model, there will be considerable disruption. What happens when: MOOCs are accepted as transfer credit, breaking the business model of higher ed? Faculty become free agents making many campuses “middle men” that can be eliminated? Students no longer take classes at a primary campus but from several institutions completing the move from mass education to my education? The credit hour is no longer the currency of higher ed (stuff learned becomes more important than time served)?   This thought-provoking presentation will explore how the forces of technology and globalization will redefine higher education, and provide guidance on how to not only survive, but thrive in this new paradigm.Room 101B20131007T08300020131007T091500Mark Greenfield (University at Buffalo)
200 websites, 50 pixels, 1 design: how to rebuild a universal online branding tool
200 websites, 50 pixels, 1 design: how to rebuild a universal online branding tool (UAD1)The first 50 pixels of your website can speak volumes to your users. How do you effectively utilize this space to engage your visitors, while providing the most useful and meaningful content available? In this presentation, we will talk about reimagining the University of Central Florida’s university header (the “black bar”), from aesthetics and content to usability and performance, and everything in between. We will discuss the challenges of implementing a new content strategy on existing websites that are controlled by other university organizations. How do you accommodate for all the existing websites’ content, styles, scripts, and server languages with a single widget? How do you prevent confusion with other sites’ content? And how do you squeeze it all into the top 50 pixels of each webpage? From this presentation, you can expect to take away new insights on brand strategy and usability for your university as a whole.Room 106A20131007T08300020131007T091500Jo Dickson (University of Central Florida), Roger Wolf (University of Central Florida)
Making The Connection Between Big Data, Cloud Services, Mobility and Interactive Maps for Higher Ed
Making The Connection Between Big Data, Cloud Services, Mobility and Interactive Maps for Higher Ed (COR1)FIve years ago, campus maps were static and the data was managed by facilities managers and IT using traditionally disparate in-house systems.  Now, cross functional teams within higher ed use multi-purpose interactive, dynamic, and data rich maps to reach anyone on and off campus.  With cloud aggregation of many data sources and seamless mobile integration, high ed organizations now have a choice to either rent or build or buy maps as a platform. Room 101A20131007T08300020131007T091500Oliver Davis (concept3D, Inc.), Blyth Morrell (Duke University)
9:30
10:15
AM
Leveraging mobile to increase student engagement
Leveraging mobile to increase student engagement (AIM2)Make your course content more accessible and increase student engagement by leveraging mobile devices and social media tools to communicate lessons, readings, assignments and feedback to students in and out of the traditional classroom. In this workshop, we will go over how to make your course content mobile-friendly and accessible to students outside of the classroom. Leverage social media and social media tools to keep students informed, engaged and interacting with content, peers and you (the instructor). Learn to implement mobile web technologies, web applications and modify existing web services to make your classroom a future-friendly learning environment, leveraging aspects of the mobile platform, mobile web and student communication habits. Room 101F20131007T09300020131007T101500Andrew Smyk (Sheridan College)
Living Dead Week
Living Dead Week (MPD2)Google has their twenty percent time and Apple has Blue Sky but what are you doing to foster growth and innovation in yourself, your colleagues, and your organization? Within one group at Purdue, affectionately known as Living Dead Week, designers and developers are given time each semester to work on something that they believe will help move the university forward. We all have a job to do but what would happen if we deliberately pushed aside the unending list of prioritized projects handed down to us from on high and did something we truly wanted to do? In other words, if you were your own boss, what would you spend your time doing? During this presentation Jason Fish will explore how this is being done within his group at Purdue University. He will share the experiences that have made Living Dead Week successful for the past three years. Lessons learned, guidelines, culture, and both good and not-so-good projects will be discussed so that you can jump start something similar when you return home.Room 106B20131007T09300020131007T101500Jason Fish (Purdue University)
Website of Dreams: If You Build It, Will They Come?
Website of Dreams: If You Build It, Will They Come? (MCS2)Grinnell College in Iowa had a website that wasn’t representing the school well, and an intranet system that had been hijacked by users to bypass the main site. When tasked with redesigning the site, Grinnell needed to differentiate itself from its peers, and bring users back. Grinnell boasts rigorous academics, an active campus, and fantastic facilities, but many schools can claim the same. One differentiator is that Grinnell celebrates the individual. Through its welcoming culture of self-governance and the ability to create your own curriculum, the college empowers students to carve their own way through the college experience. It is not the only school that allows a student to do this, though it is one of the few.So we asked: how do we distinguish Grinnell's unique take on crafting an individual education from its peers? How do we show the activities and news happening on campus? How does Grinnell bring users back from the intranet? How do we make as many departments as possible happy with a full redesign? And lastly, how do we best use Drupal to make it all happen? We decided to demonstrate it with a website that allows users to customize their experience on the site. Learn how Grinnell College, Promet Source (the developers) and Rogue Element (the design firm) worked together to create a customizable website: how Rogue designed it, how Promet built it and how Grinnell planned to use it.Room 101C20131007T09300020131007T101500Allison Manley (Rogue Element Inc), John Nollin (Promet Source), Andy Kucharski (Promet Source)
Get More out of CSS with Less
Get More out of CSS with Less (TPR2)CSS revolutionized the way we design websites, but anyone who's had to hunt for hex codes when updating colors or use long blocks of browser-specific extensions to implement features like rounded corners knows it's not always the most elegant tool to use. Less builds on where CSS falls short, adding support for variables, repeatable declarations and even simple logic to stylesheet documents. Less is 100 percent backwards-compatible with standard CSS, so there is no learning curve to get started and it can be integrated into almost any framework with ease. And since less compiles into minified CSS, it works with any modern browser. This session will introduce the language constructs of Less, including, mixins, parameters, guard expressions and functions. We'll look at several compilers for Less, including the official embedable JavaScript and command-line compilers, GUI-based tools that automatically compile as you edit, and third-party compilers that can be added to build tools and web frameworks. Finally, we'll discuss some strategies for getting the most flexibility from Less.Room 101G20131007T09300020131007T101500Jason Pitoniak (Rochester Institute of Technology)
Blog Me Baby One More Time
Blog Me Baby One More Time (TIE2)Can blogging really make a difference to a student’s academic experience? Is there any real value to maintaining a blog? Can we prove there is value added to the educational experience? You bet there is, because we’ve studied it! In general English classes, blogs have been used to encourage engagement with other students, increasing the quality of writing and discourse in the classroom. In a basic nutrition course, students create content for general publication and engage deeper with the material to gain a greater understanding of their chosen topics. In composition classes, students who blogged had almost double the success in getting a paper published in a reviewed journal, either as is or with only minor revisions. (We even have the data to prove it!) In our Year Abroad programs, student blogs put it all together -- documenting their travels, providing geographic and cultural touchpoints for students and instructors back in the campus classroom, and provide some of the best marketing material the department has ever seen, all in the authentic student voice. Instructors are finding real value in these blogging initiatives and often, when they try it in one course, are anxious to integrate blogs into other classes as well. So don’t knock the blog -- in fact, promote it. It does a student good.Room 101B20131007T09300020131007T101500Robin Smail (Firebrand Tribe), Audrey Romano (Penn State University)
Creating a “Responsive” Web Community on Campus
Creating a “Responsive” Web Community on Campus (UAD2)Have you been asked to do more with less? Do you wish Web issues could be coordinated better across your campus? Are you trying to push out a responsive/mobile strategy across your Web systems? If you answered yes to any of these questions, you are facing the same challenges as many other institutions. Shrinking resources, expanded Web services, and the mobile movement are creating problems for institutions of all sizes. Utah Valley University is facing all of these challenges. Through their move to responsive design, however, they have uncovered a secret gem weaved throughout their institution: a community of Web content contributors, site managers, and developers eager to pitch in and be part of the solution. Using their responsive Web design project, their current CMS tools, and a communications plan, they have tapped this vast community resource to help move the Web effort forward on campus. Come learn how to stimulate your Web community on campus by focusing CMS efforts to be user-centric rather than developer-focused, how to leverage the energy around mobile and RWD to your resource advantage, and how to create a two-way communications plan that engages Web users across your campus. Room 106A20131007T09300020131007T101500Nathan Gerber (Utah Valley University)
A New Framework for Web Governance.
A New Framework for Web Governance. (COR2)Web Governance issues loom large in many universities. Yet, confusion about how to tackle them means they are often ignored. This needs to stop!  In this session we will explore a new framework for Web Governance; one that encompasses everything you need to know about managing your website, intranet or other digital presence. You will learn that the basic elements of Web Governance are the same for every organisation (the same activities & the same resources), all that changes is the granularity & sophistication by which they are implemented.  Understanding this framework will give you the confidence you need to design a new configuration that suits your needs. Ultimately, this will lead to better decisions, better quality & better ROI in such critical areas as staffing, technology, budgeting & more. Room 101A20131007T09300020131007T101500Shane Diffily (Diffily.com)
10:15
10:45
AM
Refreshment Break (Ballroom)
2d3bf9c4-45ea-4f0f-be57-c5eeae2bd6b2@2013.highedweb.org 20131007T10150020131007T104500
10:45
11:30
AM
Facing your fears: Is a mobile app challenge right for you?
Facing your fears: Is a mobile app challenge right for you? (AIM3)Are you tempted, curious, vexed or downright afraid of holding an app challenge?  If so, join us for a candid discussion of the pros and cons of holding one on your campus.   Apps are everywhere. With more than 750,000 in the app store alone, it's clear this isn’t a passing fad. In response to the current trend, many universities are holding app development contests to engage students, inspire creativity and, in some cases, augment the development of campus resources. But for many more the question remains: Will an app contest add value for my school?  And even if it does, how hard is it to implement?  The University of Chicago has held two app challenges in the past nine months. Unlike many contests, both were open to students, staff and faculty and did not require programming expertise. Our most recent challenge was a partnership between the IT Services organization, UChicago Tech (tech transfer) and the Polsky Center for Entrepreneurship, and was divided into 3 phases: ideation, prototyping, and development. Phase one resulted in 113 entries from students, faculty and staff, with app ideas in healthcare, education, law enforcement, and utilities, among others. The app challenge has allowed us to: Develop and grow relationships across campus with new and existing partners  Develop a project framework that can be extended to other, high-stakes projects  Cultivate new app and mobile development channels that will benefit IT Services beyond the app challenge  Enhance the image of the IT organization as a trusted partner and resourceRoom 101F20131007T10450020131007T113000Cornelia Bailey (University of Chicago, IT Services)
Can You Pass the Social Media License Test? Social Media TOS Crash Course
Can You Pass the Social Media License Test? Social Media TOS Crash Course (MPD3)There is no such thing as the Social Media License Test.Whether you join Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Instagram, Pinterest or any other social media platform, you can still check the "I agree" box without reading any of their lengthy terms of service (TOS). Despite all the talk about social media policies in higher education, basic TOS infractions are still common place.What you don't know as a social media professional can hurt your work, so don't toss the TOS! In this session, you'll get the CliffNotes version of the major terms any social media professional working in higher education should know and why it's a bad idea to ignore the rules in social media land.Room 106B20131007T10450020131007T113000Karine Joly (Higher Ed Experts)
Creating a Cohesive Website Experience from Scratch
Creating a Cohesive Website Experience from Scratch (MCS3)How do you get over 30 department and center sites from a place of utter chaos and confusion to one of consistency and communication? We'll talk about how Jennifer Pope was able to do just that for the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at Rutgers-Camden. Pope will cover the important steps in setting up a seamless network of information, how to create a standardized look and message for your fragmented websites and how to look at the big picture while still paying attention to the details. Rutgers-Camden Faculty of Arts and Sciences now uses WordPress as their sole content management system, and we'll discuss the pros and cons of this CMS, as well as how to overcome the difficulties in change management as everyone settles into using a new CMS.Room 101C20131007T10450020131007T113000Jennifer Pope (Rutgers University-Camden)
CSS3 Polyfill Bootstrap Grid - or what are all these new frameworks and why should you care?
CSS3 Polyfill Bootstrap Grid - or what are all these new frameworks and why should you care? (TPR3)By now, we all know that HTML5 and CSS3 are important tools for modern web development. And of course, responsive web design is the future. But how does that work in a world where people still use IE8? In this presentation, Shahab Lashkari will discuss the current state of browser support for these newer standards and talk about modern tools and frameworks that will allow you to take advantage of these great technologies without having to reinvent the wheel. By the end of this presentation, you will walk away not only with an understanding of what these frameworks can do but will have the ability to build a simple, responsive, cross-browser compatible template in minutes.Room 101G20131007T10450020131007T113000Shahab Lashkari (OmniUpdate, Inc.)
The Digital Revolution in Education
The Digital Revolution in Education (TIE3)The digital era is causing the biggest cognitive revolution since the invention of writing. Knowing that the human brain adapts and changes according to the environment, we can say that we are probably experience a huge transformation in humanity accelerated by the speed of technological innovations. We moved from the Industrial Era to the Digital Era, where information is no longer scarce and become easily available. The new assets that education must provide today is critical thinking, creativity and connectivity to allow solving problems in real-time, which cannot be done with old formulas. In this sense, the scenario has become much more complex. While students have embraced quickly and naturally the new socio-technological environment, the institutions have struggled trying to adopt new educational and business models to face the transformations. This presentation will discuss the main transformations in how students learn and interact with education bringing us to the present scenario and then it will focus on the challenges and opportunities it brings to the educational institutions and educators.Room 101B20131007T10450020131007T113000Martha Gabriel (HSM Educacao)
E-Expectations 2013: The Implications of Increased Mobile Browsing for College Web Development
E-Expectations 2013: The Implications of Increased Mobile Browsing for College Web Development (UAD3)The increased use of mobile devices by high school students is changing how they research colleges and universities online. How can campuses best meet the needs and expectations of prospective students who are browsing on smartphones and tablets? This session will discuss data from a new survey of more than 2,000 college-bound high school juniors and seniors. Attendees will learn their expectations and behaviors when browsing college websites, visiting college social media sites, responding to e-mails from campuses, receiving text messages, and other e-recruitment activities. The session will cover which content is most important to the mobile user, whether students are inclined to complete forms on mobile devices, how they prefer to interact with campus personnel, and which online tools and resources they value most when researching colleges. Stephanie Geyer and Lance Merker will compare the preferences of computer and mobile device users and discuss how campuses can optimize the online experience for all user groups. Geyer and Merker will also share how responses have changed to items surveyed in previous E-Expectations studies and differences among key student populations. Ultimately, attendees will understand not only how they can meet the online expectations of all students, but how they can provide a consistent, informative, and relevant browsing experience across different platforms. Room 106A20131007T10450020131007T113000Stephanie Geyer (Noel-Levtz), Lance Merker (OmniUpdate, Inc.)
Powerful Content Syndication Across a Network of Higher Ed Sites
Powerful Content Syndication Across a Network of Higher Ed Sites (COR3)Many institutions of higher education struggle to manage their network of public and private sites powered by different Content Management Systems. Creating, sharing, managing, and finding content can become very cumbersome when you have multiple sites. And putting everything into one site is typically impractical, if not impossible. Six Feet Up will demonstrate how to deliver a better experience and save time with PushHub, an open source technology to Syndicate, Curate, and Find distributed content. Learn how to syndicate content across various CMSs and intranets while maintaining workflows and per-article editorial control. University case studies will be shared. About Six Feet Up:Founded in 1999, Six Feet Up is a woman-owned company  that develops,  hosts and supports open source sophisticated web projects, from enterprise content management and collaboration solutions to custom web apps.  Our clients include top universities and life sciences organizations, growing and distributed teams, as well as Fortune 500 companies.Room 101A20131007T10450020131007T113000Calvin Hendryx-Parker (Six Feet Up, Inc.)
11:45
AM –
12:30
PM
Measuring Web Performance
Measuring Web Performance (AIM4)Today, a Web page can be delivered to desktop computers, televisions, or handheld devices like tablets or phones. While a technique like responsive design helps ensure that our websites look good across that spectrum of devices we may forget that we need to make sure that our websites also perform well across that same spectrum. More and more of our users are shifting their Internet usage to these more varied platforms and connection speeds with some moving entirely to mobile Internet. In this session, we’ll look at the tools that can help you understand, measure and improve the performance of your websites and applications. The talk will also discuss how new server-side techniques might help us optimize our front-end performance. Finally, since the best way to test is to have devices in your hand, we’ll discuss some tips for getting your hands on them cheaply. This presentation builds upon Dave Olsen’s “Optimization for Mobile” chapter in Smashing Magazine’s “The Mobile Book.” Room 101F20131007T11450020131007T123000Dave Olsen (West Virginia University)
How I Made this Presentation: Using the Tools of the Web to Present About It.
How I Made this Presentation: Using the Tools of the Web to Present About It. (MPD4)As Web professionals we spend years developing expertise with the tools of our trade, but when it's time to give a presentation we throw our lot in with Powerpoint, or Keynote, or maybe Google or Prezi. Well, times have changed, and now there are good *web* tools we can present with. In this talk I'll show you how to make the task of preparing a presentation more like what you already do best, how to leverage your existing tool sets, and how choosing this approach can improve both collaboration and sharing.Room 106B20131007T11450020131007T123000Sven Aas (Mount Holyoke College)
Instagram: Make crowdsourced photos work for you!
Instagram: Make crowdsourced photos work for you! (MCS4)7,000+ Instagram photos have been submitted by the Brown University community to the 'Scene by you at Brown' Instagram campaign in the past 10 months. Located in historic Providence, Rhode Island and founded in 1764, Brown is an independent, coeducational Ivy League institution and the seventh-oldest college in the United States; Instagram is now helping tell Brown’s story.It is impossible to have a campus photographer be everywhere at once, at all times of day and night, to capture everything that happens at a University. But thanks to crowdsourced, user-generated, mobile photo sharing apps like Instagram, a single admin can now “employ” thousands of digital photo journalists to tell the University’s story through their own handheld perspectives.Crowdsourcing campus photos offers local, national and international audiences an intimate glimpse into life at a University; big events, lectures, local landmarks, sporting events, weather phenomena, TEDx events and the changing of the seasons are all captured in realtime and redisplayed to the world. Alumni reminisce, prospective students get a behind-the-scenes look, current students are engage on a new level, and the global community is along for the ride.Learn how to aggregate user-generated photos, navigate user permission, privacy concerns and connect local and global communities around mobile apps like Instagram!  Room 101C20131007T11450020131007T123000John S. Murphy (Brown University)
Exploiting XML, XSLT & JSON - Avoiding pitfalls in multimodal distribution
Exploiting XML, XSLT & JSON - Avoiding pitfalls in multimodal distribution (TPR4)Description In the information silos of today’s university environment, multiple sources of content are difficult to integrate. Deploying a Web ecosystem that exploits XML, XSLT and JSON allows for rapid deployment of multimodal information distribution channels across Web, print, email, mobile, social networks, and digital signage. In addition to a fast paced overview of XML, XSLT and JSON, during this session, we will present lessons learned and the critical success factors of building an enterprise class information architecture. The focus will be on use cases for the publish once and distribute everywhere model, including an inventory of existing applications, data structures, data transforms, and distribution strategies. Learning Objectives include: an overview of XML, XSLT, and JSON; an evaluation criteria of the data structures of existing apps; deploying an ecosystem which supports persistent feeds; strategies for efficient content publishing and reuse audience; application developers; and systems integrators. Room 101G20131007T11450020131007T123000Jim Gardiner (Active Data Exchange), David Lavigna (Active Data Exchange)
From Webinar to Webby: Translating Flat Content into an Award-Winning Interactive Online Course
From Webinar to Webby: Translating Flat Content into an Award-Winning Interactive Online Course (TIE4)Beekeeping 101, launched to the public in July 2012, is a media-rich, engaging, non-credit, online course for new beekeepers offered by Penn State. Media experts from Penn State Public Media along with beekeeping experts from Penn State Extension and the Department of Entomology designed this course to serve as an experimental pilot project in an effort to better understand the requirements for the creation of effective, relevant and desirable online education. Instructional Designer Shawn Vashaw and Producer/Director Diane Espy will detail lessons learned converting what was formerly a dry, static, Powerpoint-based webinar into an educational experience named as a Webby Honoree in 2013. Room 101B20131007T11450020131007T123000Shawn Vashaw (Penn State Public Media), Diane Espy (Penn State Public Media)
Flash Usability, or What Kind of Candy Bars Work Best to Get User Feedback
Flash Usability, or What Kind of Candy Bars Work Best to Get User Feedback (UAD4)A growing consensus across academia on the importance of the end user experience hasn’t yet resulted in wide adoption of best practices. Stop guessing about what your users want, or what they understand, and come learn how you can reap the benefits of Flash Usability for your organization. Flash Usability Testing, sometimes known as Guerrilla Usability Testing, is a simple testing technique that repays a minimal amount of time and effort with quantifiable results. A typical test leverages a few hours invested in running 5-10 minute sessions to harvest valuable feedback from a sampling of 10-20 users. With the techniques of Flash Usability end users otherwise unreachable, contribute to improving your systems in exchange for some sweet, sweet candy thrown in for incentive. This technique has been used to test a number of sites and systems at Cornell, including Library mobile sites on a variety of platforms provided by the users, prototype homepages for website redesigns, and even to determine which icons and terminology are easiest for users to understand, to help inform the development and user interface of a new system. This briskly paced session will focus on how you can begin to conduct Flash Usability Testing, including exclusive access to the highly sought-after list:  "Candy Bars Most Likely to Entice Users." Room 106A20131007T11450020131007T123000Mary Beth Martini-Lyons (Cornell University Library)
Building a Calendar That Doesn't Suck
Building a Calendar That Doesn't Suck (COR4)Lots of schools have great websites.  How come so few of them have great calendars?Jason is the president of White Whale Web Services, developers of the LiveWhale content management system. In 2012, the LiveWhale team embarked on a quest to create the perfect higher ed calendaring system. In the process they learned something calendaring is SUPER HARD. No wonder there are so few good ones!Over time the team adjusted its goal from "building the perfect calendaring solution" to "building a calendar that doesn't suck." They believe they've succeeded.In his presentation, Jason will talk about the reasons calendaring is so hard, and the reasons so many calendars suck, and some ways to make your own calendar suck less (whether you use LiveWhale Calendar or not).Room 101A20131007T11450020131007T123000Jason Pontius (White Whale)
12:30
1:10
PM
Lunch, sponsored by White Whale (Exhibit Hall)
3ca0926d-1894-4dfc-9694-04778d0d1255@2013.highedweb.org 20131007T12300020131007T131000
1:10
2:45
PM
General Session
Steve Wozniak
Author, speaker, co-founder of Apple Computer Inc. and chief scientist at Fusion-io
20131007T131000 20131007T1145000 Steve Wozniak
3:00
3:45
PM
Hyperlinked Native Mobile Applications
Hyperlinked Native Mobile Applications (AIM5)Although the world isn't quite ready to accept it yet, app stores will go away and become a thing of the past. What will take the place of app stores? Will the mobile browser takeover? Will there even be a concept of mobile vs. table vs. desktop? No, this isn't a talk about native vs. HTML5. The World Wide Web has enabled so many technologies, even in the past 5 years. Yet it seems like we've taken a few steps back when it comes to native mobile application development. The World Wide Web though has provided us with a very important concept that has been slow to come to mobile applications: the hyperlink. Wouldn't it be great if native mobile apps worked the same was webpages do in the browser? In a browser, when a link is clicked, the browser navigates to the URL and renders the markup to create an interactive user experience. Why can't we do that in native mobile applications? Well guess what? With a little bit of mashing-up of existing technologies, we can! In this talk, Jim Muir describes technical methods for achieving this on various platforms (iOS, Android, BlackBerry 10). There will also be a demo of a real-life "hyperlink-enabled" application. Imagine having a single university-wide native mobile app with a distributed content model, in which the content from any department, college or other group can be hotlinked!   Room 101F20131007T15000020131007T154500Jim Muir (The Ohio State University)
Challenge Shmallenge - We've Got This: Women Paving Their Own Way
Challenge Shmallenge - We've Got This: Women Paving Their Own Way (MPD5)“I think women hold back. And they can’t. If you are following your passion, if you are doing what excites you, you’re doing a great job, recognize yourself.” -Valerie Jarrett,  senior advisor to the president and assistant to the president for public engagement and intergovernmental affairs . Did you know that women make up half the U.S. workforce but represent only 25 percent of the tech industry and lead only 8 percent of startups? And even though women obtain the majority of college degrees they represent just 15 percent of all senior management positions? Sheryl Sandberg, Facebook COO, recently said, “Men are continually applauded for being ambitious and powerful and successful, but women who display these same traits often pay a social penalty. Female accomplishment comes at a cost.” Regardless of gender, one can’t help but wonder why.Join women currently working in Higher Ed for an in-depth and empowering conversation moderated by Karine Joly, executive director at Higher Ed Experts, as together we explore the challenges women face in the workplace including work/life balance, politics, the skills that can help us succeed, the culture we must adapt to while also working to change, personal and professional expectations and the importance of educating those around us to continue pushing forward when everything is telling them to stop. Room 106B20131007T15000020131007T154500Karine Joly (Higher Ed Experts), Alana Riley (Providence College), Robin Smail (Firebrand Tribe), Colleen Brennan-Barry (Monroe Community College), Tonya Oaks Smith (UALR William H. Bowen School of Law), Mallory Wood (mStoner), Lori Packer (University of Rochester), Magen Tracy (Berklee College of Music), Georgy Cohen (Suffolk University)
The Scroll: Brand Evolution Through Social
The Scroll: Brand Evolution Through Social (MCS5)Did social media exist at Hamilton before The Scroll? Yes. Was it as visible, inclusive and as ubiquitous? Not at all. More than a moderated social media aggregator, The Scroll was created to spur social media conversation, sharing and content creation from the people that know us best: our students, alumni, faculty and community members. Find out how our strategy, pitfalls and unintended wins came together to make this one simple thing become the linchpin in our communication revolution. Attendees will learn more about: Creating a social media content strategy that goes beyond creating/managing accounts Using social media to enhance brandFinding the best content curation activities for your audience Determine the best use of found content across platformsGetting buy-in across campus and beyond How to leverage existing community managers and content creators Room 101C20131007T15000020131007T154500Jessica Krywosa (Hamilton College)
Let’s Chat: Building and implementing an institution-wide live chat
Let’s Chat: Building and implementing an institution-wide live chat (TPR5)Last year, the E-Expectations report from Noel-Levitz indicated a desire from prospective students for live-chat interactions. Live chat offers the opportunity for a real person to answer user questions instantaneously. By leveraging the UNLedu Framework -- a set of common HTML, CSS and JavaScript code run by all pages on unl.edu -- the central Web team was able to implement a scalable and robust chat system to accommodate our user’s needs. This session will explore how a $30 jQuery plugin inspired a full-blown, custom-developed multi-site open source chat infrastructure. We’ll explore the project requirements, implementation, tips, and tricks we learned along the way. Finally, we’ll discuss success measurements and how this simple tool has benefited the university.Room 101G20131007T15000020131007T154500Michael Fairchild (University of Nebraska - Lincoln)
Got Students? Get Social!
Got Students? Get Social! (TIE5)There's no better way to talk about your school than to let your students do it. Students are walking, breathing, sleeping, eating, studying embodiments of your institution's brand. Telling the story? They're living it. If you're seeking an authentic take on your school, look no further than the quad.In this session, we will:explore successful student staffed social teams (using a range of tools, from Instagram to tried and true blogging programs);discuss the ups and downs of working with students (it's an educational experience for everyone);begin to model an integrated student staffing vision that fits your school's ethos (no two schools are the same, so why look for a cookie-cutter solution to your story?); andset achievable social goals that tie into your school's mission (think SMART, and then some).Room 101B20131007T15000020131007T154500Ma'ayan Plaut (Oberlin College)
Get OUT! (Online Usability Testing)
Get OUT! (Online Usability Testing) (UAD5)Campus technologies are often developed in a vacuum, running the risk of ineffective products, dissatisfied users, and lower perceptions of the value of technology in higher education. While selective usability testing can provide this perspective, lab-based testing can be an expensive and time-consuming process that frequently only serves to rubber-stamp projects at the end of the development cycle. To address these concerns at UW-Milwaukee, the Letters and Science IT Office has developed a suite of remote usability testing apps which provide web interfaces for designing and deploying tests, as well as for analyzing test results. Current apps include surveys, card sorting, tree testing, timed testing, and click tracking—each of which can be run on mobile devices and desktop/laptop computers. This session will introduce the components of this testing suite, and share the details of our partnership with UWM’s Professional and Technical Writing program and the L&S Usability Testing Lab to form a campus usability testing research group. We’ll discuss our strategies for making these resources available for students to gain practical experience, and for campus technologists to integrate usability testing in all phases of the design process. Our goal is to begin building a theoretical base of user knowledge that can inform and improve future campus development efforts. Room 106A20131007T15000020131007T154500Danny Harvey (University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee), Josh Ebert (University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee)
Leveraging Data to Centralize a Decentralized Model
Leveraging Data to Centralize a Decentralized Model (COR5)The majority of post-secondary institutions operate in a decentralized business model, which offers a degree of autonomy to their academic units. For example, it is not uncommon for a college or university to house niche marketing, IT, and administrative departments within its major schools, programs, and ancillary groups. Rarely do these niche functions report to a senior governing body, such as Advancement, IT, or Operations departments. The decentralized model has served post-secondary institutions well in the past, but changes in the ways students and staff communicate and work together has forced modern colleges and universities to break down operational silos and build a more integrated model. This is a task that could take the better part of a decade for most colleges and universities to complete, so what elements can be executed next year to provide the best return on investment? The creation of a centralized information management strategy is the logical first step. This session will highlight some of the most common data barriers faced by post- secondary institutions, such as the application process, student and faculty engagement, and alumni relations. In each scenario, a comprehensive information management framework will be presented, providing audience members with a foundation to launch their own data centralization strategies.  Room 101A20131007T15000020131007T154500Dave Hale (Soshal)
3:45
4:15
PM
Refreshment Break (Ballroom)
8d173264-4ad6-4215-a9ce-e7e48f752d33@2013.highedweb.org 20131007T15450020131007T161500
4:15
5:00
PM
The On-Ramp to a Successful Responsive Workflow
The On-Ramp to a Successful Responsive Workflow (AIM6)The three main spokes in the wheel of Responsive Web Design are content, design, and development. Chances are you're not an expert at all three. The fact that you "get" RWD doesn't ensure your web projects' success. Many different people have a stake in the success of a web design project: content writers, information architects, graphic designers, front-end coders, back-end coders -- the list could go on. It's time to get everyone on the same page. It's time to create a better workflow. In this session, we'll discuss some ways to educate your team on the principles of Responsive Web Design and how this newly-acquired knowledge should naturally translate into finding better ways of doing your work; specifically, what your new responsive workflow might look like - by showing examples of how several web teams and industry experts are tackling this issue. Finally, we'll talk about how to foster continual innovation and education so that your team keeps pace with the speed of the web.Room 101F20131007T16150020131007T170000Peter Anglea (Bob Jones University)
Lessons Learned from a Lockdown: Using the Web and Social Media in a Crisis
Lessons Learned from a Lockdown: Using the Web and Social Media in a Crisis (MPD6)On a bright Thursday morning in April 2013, the University of Rhode Island went from calm to calamitous in an instant when a report went out that there was a man with a gun in a full lecture hall. The campus went into lockdown with 300 students locked out. Twenty thousand scared people (and their families across the globe) wondered what was going on, looked to URI for answers, and filled in gaps in information with their own versions of what they'd heard from their roommate's cousin's friend's brother. Cindy Sabato and Kerri Hicks will deliver some real-life lessons learned that day – and in its aftermath – about communicating online during a crisis. Everyone expects your website to hold all the answers they're looking for, but in a crisis, will your website be able to carry the load? We'll offer some simple (and extravagant) changes you can make to ensure your site is as stable as it can be during an emergency. We'll cover the value of making your social media leader a part of the crisis team, show examples of why even great social media communication isn't enough for some, and share a few chuckle-worthy moments of a community saying what you want to, but can't. And finally, some people aren't looking to social media or the web at all. We'll talk about how an emergency alert system can undermine the credibility of your communication response, and the pros and cons of having multiple messengers and tools.Room 106B20131007T16150020131007T170000Cindy Sabato, APR (University of Rhode Island), Kerri Hicks (University of Rhode Island)
Can Something Positive Come from This? How a School & a Community Responds to a Student Death
Can Something Positive Come from This? How a School & a Community Responds to a Student Death (MCS6)On Sept. 30 2012, a freshman at The College at Brockport State University of New York was found dead in her dorm room. Her boyfriend has been charged with her murder. The killing attracted national and international attention, in part because of eerie statements the deceased student made on social media the night of her death. In the hours after the death, The College began a concerted effort to both keep the public informed and bring the community together using social media. The effort continues this year as the campus has focused on combating domestic violence. This presentation will examine those efforts and show how they captured, promoted and encouraged a tremendous outpouring of support and kindness in what was a very dark hour for the school. The presentation will also examine the challenges faced in balancing the need to be open with your community versus the need to make sure the information you are sharing is factually accurate. The College hit records for social media engagement and heard from students, alumni and faculty that they had “never been more proud of Brockport” because of our response to the tragedy.Room 101C20131007T16150020131007T170000Dave Tyler (The College at Brockport, SUNY)
Placemarks to the people
Placemarks to the people (TPR6)Buildings and parking aren't the only locations that people need to find on your campus. Why then, are they the only items marked on your maps? The technology to create beautiful, interactive maps has been around for a while. Unfortunately, many colleges choose to only include a limited amount of information. Often, it’s not a technological hurdle, but instead a content issue. Let’s solve this by distributing the ability to add items to the map.In this 45 minute session, I will show you how to set up your own platform to collect and maintain user generated map content. It’s a lot easier than you might think. In just the past year, our maps have been extended to include campus artwork, sustainability highlights and thousands of accessibility features.Given the power, what would your users add to the map?Room 101G20131007T16150020131007T170000Gabriel Nagmay (Portland Community College)
Orientation: From In-Person to Online
Orientation: From In-Person to Online (TIE6)Last year, Xavier University made the decision to move from six in-person, on-campus orientation and registration days to an all-online experience. While the move offers greater flexibility for students and saves them the time and expense of traveling to campus, it also affects a large number of offices on campus, creating challenges from a technical side, as well as in coordination of content. Dozens of representatives came together from offices all across campus to attempt to make their disparate content feel more unified and to rework it in an engaging, online format that would still achieve the goals of the registration process and the learning outcomes for the orientation experience. Rob Liesland, senior web developer, helped shape the direction and decision-making of this large, diverse group, creating the tools they needed to organize their content and a blend of formats to deliver it. Liesland will discuss the various elements that needed to be moved from in-person to online, the challenges this content presented and what method was chosen to represent it. He will also discuss the insights gleaned from analytics and feedback for the success of the project. Room 101B20131007T16150020131007T170000Rob Liesland (Xavier University)
Let Me Introduce Myself: faculty, staff, and student profiles for community-building and careers
Let Me Introduce Myself: faculty, staff, and student profiles for community-building and careers (UAD6)Faculty, staff, and student profiles can be a powerful tool. They can serve as a first point of introduction, an easy way for community members to maintain a professional presence, and an opportunity to identify your institution with the accomplishments of your community members. They can also be an out-of-date wasteland, a UX nightmare, and a flashpoint for political and administrative conflict. In this presentation, Matt Ryan will discuss Carleton College's recently-launched profiles, what they learned in the process of designing and making it, how they attempted to solve those thorny issues, and what you can bring back to your institution from their experience.Room 106A20131007T16150020131007T170000Matt Ryan (Carleton College), Mark Heiman (Carlton College)
Must-Know Strategies for Protecting Your School's Reputation Online
Must-Know Strategies for Protecting Your School's Reputation Online (COR6)Brand reputation shouldn't be an after-thought; it should be just as important as student recruitment and retention .  That's a tough sell, right?  Not when you consider that 68% of high school students use social media to research schools; 38% have used it as a resource when deciding where to enroll; and 45% of high school students admit to being influenced by a school's engagement online.*  Your school's reputation - on Facebook, Twitter, Google & other websites - matters.   Understanding what students really say about your school online is the first step to protecting your brand image and improving your student recruitment efforts.  In this digital age, bad reviews stick and social media spreads news fast.  If you don't have a good grasp on your brand's sentiment, you might find yourself putting out fires, rather than leading the charge in positive school promotion.   In this presentation, you will learn five effective strategies for protecting your school's reputation online.  You will learn more about the use of search engine optimization and paid search in combating negative reviews.  You will also learn about measuring, monitoring and analyzing social media chatter, and the very cool tools that make this job easy.   Monitoring and measuring brand sentiment doesn't have to be a meaningless task.  Rather, it can help drive a more effective digital marketing and recruitment strategy.  As you're finalizing your 2014 marketing plan, be sure to consider the impact your digital brand has on student recruitment. Room 101A20131007T16150020131007T170000Jonathan Pogact (Fathom)
5:30
7:30
PM
Dinner on Your Own
f0293b0a-bf56-4077-8955-7d27a081a1ac@2013.highedweb.org 20131007T17300020131007T193000
7:00
12:00
PM
Hackathon (Ballroom)
9be1016a-bb24-4743-b338-6fe52567083c@2013.highedweb.org HackathonHelp us give back to our host city of Buffalo, NY through Hackathon 2013. We’ll join together to create a new, mobile-friendly website for The Ride For Roswell.20131007T19000020131007T120000
8:00
11:00
PM
HighEdWeb After Dark (Atrium, Hyatt Regency Buffalo)
916cd59e-13ed-4459-a81b-1968fcd9536e@2013.highedweb.org HighEdWeb After DarkAfter you enjoy dinner on your own in the great city of Buffalo, return to the conference hotel and join us for casual nibbles and time with friends.20131007T20000020131007T230000

Tuesday, October 8

Applications, Integration and Mobile Management and Professional Development Marketing, Content, and Social Strategy Technical: Propeller Hats Required Technology in Education Usability, Accessibility and Design Sponsors
7:00
8:30
AM
Breakfast, sponsored by CampusM (Exhibit Hall)
7da4cbb1-075f-42d9-84ba-deae770c2513@2013.highedweb.org 20131008T07000020131008T083000
7:00
AM –
5:00
PM
Registration (Lobby)
9f47ce07-2bf2-4ca1-8bbf-cf49f04f8a33@2013.highedweb.org 20131008T07000020131008T170000
8:30
9:15
AM
Your Mobile Strategy: More Walk, Less Talk.
Your Mobile Strategy: More Walk, Less Talk. (AIM7)Learn how Binghamton University transformed their website with one multi-device design: Without any steering committeesWorking mobile first; supporting handheld, laptop, desktop screen sizes; optimized for touch/gesture-based and cursor/keyboard-based computers; accounting for hi-res screens; managing for performanceIntroducing one multi-device (responsive) design most efficientlyAll while wrangling a herd of cats called apps We're all talking about the importance of mobile to our institutions. But, not all are taking action quickly to meet the wave of demand. Take away actionable items from this presentation to jump-start your mobile efforts with more walk and less talk.Room 101F20131008T08300020131008T091500Drew Hill (Binghamton University)
Study Abroad: Borrowing Ideas, Design, and Strategies from Beyond the Walls of Academia
Study Abroad: Borrowing Ideas, Design, and Strategies from Beyond the Walls of Academia (MPD7)The big winners in marketing are rarely institutions of higher education. When tech blogs cover the coolest, newest, and most winningest, it's never that university that went through a redesign last month. If we face the facts, we're not blazing trails like the new startup that's got everyone drooling. That world feels like a foreign country when compared to the conversations and politics we deal with each day. So, maybe it's time we did our own sort of study abroad. Wouldn't it be cool if the best design and strategy wasn't happening outside of our hallowed halls, but was being made by us? Our 'study abroad' program will draw from the best design, the most effective messaging, and the smartest strategies to provide a vision of where creative marketing in higher education could be. Come be inspired, refreshed, and energized to do cool things.Room 106B20131008T08300020131008T091500Joel G Goodman (Bravery Transmedia)
Making Movies
Making Movies (MCS7)Are you creating great videos for your campus? You should be and you can. This session will go over some tips and tricks from four folks that are already doing it. Learn best practices around livestreaming, captioning, using time lapse and employing student videographers in this panel presentation focused on helping you make better videos. Larry Falck from Francis Marion University will present on multi-camera livestreaming. Kerri Hicks from The University of Rhode Island will talk about why captioning your videos is important, not just from an ethical and legal standpoint, but for SEO and global reputation management, and will demonstrate a tool and process that makes it super simple. Chris Judge from Providence College will demonstrate how to create time lapse video to make your videos awesome. Paul Fairbanks from Gettysburg College will share how he uses student videographers to maximize his video resources. Attendees will leave with wheels turning and resources that include equipment (and software) lists, where to find the best online tutorials, forums, and user groups, and the comfort of knowing that they too can make great videos.Room 101C20131008T08300020131008T091500Kerri Hicks (University of Rhode Island), Paul Fairbanks (Gettysburg College), Larry Falck (Francis Marion University), Chris Judge (Providence College)
Git in the Van: A Punk Rock Approach to Revision Control
Git in the Van: A Punk Rock Approach to Revision Control (TPR7)Annette Liskey argues that Git is the ideal revision control system for development teams because of its distributed model. Git's flexibility allows for non-linear development, with options for branching and merging that meet the developers' needs rather than forcing them to conform to the workflow enforced by the system. By allowing each contributer to work individually with a full copy of the code repository, Git promotes experimentation and autonomy in programming. Analogies to the punk rock movement help to demonstrate Git's small footprint, fast implementation and heterarchical system for approving code changes. Liskey's experience with Git comes from implementing it in the workflow for Technology and Design, a team that includes over 20 student employees and only two professional staff members who provide marketing and creative services for the University Unions department at James Madison University.Room 101G20131008T08300020131008T091500Annette Liskey (James Madison University)
The Power of Intimacy
The Power of Intimacy (TIE7)What differentiates compelling, life-shaping content that lives in the hearts and minds of its recipients from news blurbs that are quickly cast into digital oblivion? Kel Hahn, Associate Director of Communications in the University of Kentucky College of Engineering, believes it is an unwavering commitment to intimacy with one's work. Content developers -- whether writers, multimedia developers, social media developers, etc.-- must approach all facets of their craft with genuine curiosity, personal interest in people and a determination to promote others in ways that will bring them more recognition and opportunity. A commitment to intimacy will lead to greater job satisfaction and increased opportunities to positively impact others. In 2012, Hahn wrote an article about a professor who was conducting largely unfunded research that had the potential to directly contribute to his son's autism therapy. The article attracted the attention of the Chronicle of Higher Education, who also wrote an article. Four months later, the National Science Foundation awarded the professor an $800,000 grant for his research. While Hahn does not make a direct correlation between his article and the subsequent funding, he does contend that a commitment to intimacy in the research, interview and writing process is much more likely to produce such results than simply churning out content. Room 101B20131008T08300020131008T091500Kel Hahn (University of Kentucky College of Engineering)
Making "cool" web backgrounds accessible for VDT photosensitivity
Making "cool" web backgrounds accessible for VDT photosensitivity (UAD7)Modern CSS and HTML gives web designers some pretty cool design effects without the need for Flash. It can be tricky, however, to implement these effects in a way that works on older browsers and is also compatible with accessibility requirements for low contrast display settings. In this presentation Michael Miller will share his experiences with making full page background images and CSS-only gradient backgrounds accessible for users who require low contrast displays because of photosensitivity.Room 106A20131008T08300020131008T091500Michael Miller (Malone University)
Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs: The Future of Web Marketing in Higher Education
Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs: The Future of Web Marketing in Higher Education (COR7)The digital age has revolutionized the way prospective and enrolled students engage with institutions, but colleges and universities still struggle with many traditional marketing challenges such as consistency of experience, brand control, and time-to-market.  To combat these challenges in a digital world and keep up with the pace of innovation, many schools are building comprehensive web delivery platforms.  In this session, let's discuss how these solutions can be leveraged not only to support today's higher education business, but in mitigating the challenges and curve balls of an uncertain future. Room 101A20131008T08300020131008T091500Chris Hartigan (Acquia)
9:30
10:15
AM
In Users We Trust: Using Social Media APIs to Build Community
In Users We Trust: Using Social Media APIs to Build Community (AIM8)Chapman University’s web and interactive marketing team has gotten in the habit of asking big questions: How to give power to the people, and how to use social media API’s to measure the value of good content?  Social media has already transformed how universities connect with students, but team members David May, Sheri Lehman, Ben Cole, Meghan Farrington, and Miles Zimmerman believe these questions can unlock a more engaged experience. These questions inspired us to create Social.Chapman.edu, a live, real-time feed of more than 50 social media accounts across campus. In just 6 months, our feed has collected more than 10,000 stories from Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Wordpress, giving users a true (and accessible) snapshot of life at Chapman. Brendan Mayer of The Lawlor Group tweeted, “This realtime #socialmedia hub is the best I’ve seen in #highered. Beautiful & engaging… Well done @ChapmanU!” In this session, we will connect theory to practice and talk about where we are going with our interactive marketing strategies. We will talk about our use of social media APIs and open source web technologies such as node.js, MongoDB and HTLM5 web sockets. Lastly, we will connect how these tools help us find and display great content for our audiences. Room 101F20131008T09300020131008T101500Sheri Lehman (Chapman University), Ben Cole (Chapman University)
Academic Startups (Can we do this at home?)
Academic Startups (Can we do this at home?) (MPD8)Chances are good the president, provost, dean, or department head you work for did not promise to leave things exactly as they were when they started in their current role. In fact, they may have taken the job BECAUSE they wanted to be change-agents in your organization. They want to do a startup. To be useful in this context, higher-ed web and communications professionals need a range of skills, aptitudes, and tolerances that are often more present among 20-something entrepreneurs than they are among university staffers. How do we acquire the right skills? What is the correct use of technology to accomplish your goals? What role can internal and external partnerships play in a project? How do you create and sustain momentum on a new initiative while keeping the big old barge of your institution afloat? This session will focus on the story of one startup project from the School of Engineering at MIT. (For the record: we do not claim to know the answers to all these questions, or to have navigated all of these issues with perfect success. We'll just tell you what we learned.)Room 106B20131008T09300020131008T101500Chad Galts (MIT)
Text First! Applying Progressive Enhancement to Multimedia Content
Text First! Applying Progressive Enhancement to Multimedia Content (MCS8)How to you adapt audio, video, and interactive content to meet the needs, preferences, and devices for all visitors? How do you select the right media type to meet your objectives? How do you develop media-rich content with limited resources? In this session, Dawson and Masssaro Kauffman will discuss how they use "text-first" approach to developing multimedia, how they prioritize media development, and how they iterate through or media projects so that they provide multiple solutions and constantly improve our work.Room 101C20131008T09300020131008T101500Nikki Massaro Kauffman (Penn State World Campus), Heather Dawson (Penn State World Campus)
Got the CRUD? I hope so.
Got the CRUD? I hope so. (TPR8)Learn how to create a simple CRUD (Create Read Update Delete) PHP/MYSQL web application from start to finish in this session. Use these tools to more effectively manage faculty data, FAQs, student ambassador profiles and contact information, scholarship opportunities, request information form submissions, etc (the sky's the limit) by providing a simple web interface for your users to maintain departmental/school data themselves (spread the CRUD love). Sample project files will be made available.Room 101G20131008T09300020131008T101500Lacy Tite (Vanderbilt University)
Something borrowed, something new: Promoting the use of digital equipment through short term use
Something borrowed, something new: Promoting the use of digital equipment through short term use (TIE8)One University offers a collection of digital equipment, including iPads, laptops, digital cameras, digital audio recorders, microphones, networking cables, projectors and financial/graphing calculators. These items were acquired through a Student Technology Fee process overseen by the University’s IT Services. This application based process provides one-time money for technology resources, particularly those which have the greatest impact to on students. Items which the Libraries have acquired through this fund are available at three of the four main campus libraries for loan periods of between three hours and one day. This session will discuss the scope of the collection, usage patterns, technical support needed to maintain the collection, and proposed changes to the size of the collection and the rules governing its use. Participants in this discussion should gain a sense of the budgetary and human resources needed to maintain a working collection of digital items for loan, challenges to maintaining and growing the collection, and ideas for developing a collection that meets the needs of their primary users.Room 101B20131008T09300020131008T101500Rob Withers (Miami University)
Postdesktop Usability
Postdesktop Usability (UAD8)The era of desktop-first methodologies has ended. According to Google, 90% of consumers now use multiple screens to accomplish tasks on the web. As we enter the renaissance of the postdesktop web, we must be prepared to boldly alter how we prototype, design, and gather feedback from audiences. Two of the most important factors for current web usability are considering the screen (designing and testing for multiple displays) and context (delivering content and utility based on location, identity, activity, and time). This session will examine how screen and input types are changing: • multi-screen design • prototyping • new input types • usability testingRoom 106A20131008T09300020131008T101500Doug Gapinski (mStoner)
Making Digital Asset Management A Success For Higher Education
Making Digital Asset Management A Success For Higher Education (COR8)When you have digital asset management (DAM) needs, it helps to gain insights from others in your field. Those who understand the unique challenges you’re facing and meet them head on. Nina Brakel-Schutt, Brand Strategist at Widen, and Corey Chimko, Global DAM Administrator at Cornell University, will team up to share best practices for DAM in higher education. In this presentation, we'll spotlight Cornell University by showcasing their approach to taxonomy, site setup and implementation, content sharing, and more. Join us to get a clear picture of how digital asset management has helped Cornell University save time, streamline workflows and achieve brand consistency.Here are the topics we’ll cover:Key considerations when planning for a DAM systemHow to approach metadata and searchMigrating assets to a categorized structureChoosing a DAM administratorUser governanceKeeping your DAM system up-to-date  Room 101A20131008T09300020131008T101500Nina Brakel-Schutt (Widen), Corey Chimko (Cornell University)
10:15
10:45
AM
Refreshment Break (Ballroom)
abde94fa-03a4-4535-8954-fff1778fd5ef@2013.highedweb.org 20131008T10150020131008T104500
10:45
11:30
AM
Apps, APIs, and the End of the Internet
Apps, APIs, and the End of the Internet (AIM9)"That's a great web app you built, but does it have an API?" APIs have become an essential part of modern web applications. They let us connect applications, automate actions, combine information, and repurpose tools to meet our needs. APIs seem a natural outgrowth of the fundamental openness of the Internet, but they have a darker side. Site-specific APIs give the illusion of openness while locking users and software into a specific site. Many sites from Twitter to Netflix to Google are pulling what feels like a bait-and-switch with their APIs, leaving developers and users hanging with apps and mashups that no longer work. We can send email from anywhere to anywhere, but we can only tweet through twitter.com. Twitter controls what we can do via their API, and Twitter can change it at any time. Our email clients work with any email account. Our web browsers work with any web site. Why are web apps different? In this semi-technical session, Faulkner will examine why the world of APIs is shifting. He'll talk about the differences between APIs and their more flexible cousin, protocols, and why we might use one over the other. Finally, Faulkner will look at the risks that web developers take when we rely too much on third-party APIs. The World Wide Web of today was crafted decades ago by thoughtful developers who chose a protocol over an API. We face choices today that will shape the web for decades to come.Room 101F20131008T10450020131008T113000Don Faulkner (University of Arkansas)
YES YOU CAN! How to Train 650 CMS Users in 18 Months (with Only 3 Employees)
YES YOU CAN! How to Train 650 CMS Users in 18 Months (with Only 3 Employees) (MPD9)Western Kentucky University launched an enterprise-wide CMS conversion in 2011 that involved hundreds of faculty, staff and students as site creators and contributors. Learn how WKU’s Marketing and IT divisions joined forces to partner on a successful CMS implementation and training program that used a combination of open forums, hands-on training workshops, online modules, a self-help website and more. Discover how smart policies can save you in a pinch and how creating a campus Web Council can give your users the voice they deserve in your site’s creation. Join Corie Martin and Diana Keeling as they take you on a magical journey that will show you how even the smallest of web teams can tackle the hugest of projects, obtain campus-wide buy-in, create a synergistic web culture and maintain a lasting partnership between Marketing and IT. YES YOU CAN do all of this with limited time and few resources (without killing each other and making a campus full of enemies).Room 106B20131008T10450020131008T113000Corie Martin (Western Kentucky University), Diana Keeling (Western Kentucky University)
Stay Ahead of the Curve: Conducting a Competitive Web Content Analysis
Stay Ahead of the Curve: Conducting a Competitive Web Content Analysis (MCS9)In order to make informed decisions about your website, you need an understanding of what content you have and whether or not it’s any good. Hello, content audit! But how do you know if your findings are appropriate, if your recommendations will work, and if your new-and-improved content will put you ahead of the competition? Hello, competitive analysis! A competitive analysis of web content is an assessment of competing websites based on your content goals. Your assessment criteria might include branding, usability, accessibility, information architecture, or any other element of your web content strategy. In this session, learn how to evaluate what web elements work well for other higher ed institutions, what problems you want to avoid, and how you can innovate. There are many examples of great content in higher ed, but there are just as many examples of poor quality content. A competitive analysis will help you stay on the winning side.Room 101C20131008T10450020131008T113000Rick Allen (Meet Content)
WordPress Themes 102
WordPress Themes 102 (TPR9)During this session, Curtiss Grymala will run through some of the handiest tips and tricks for developing your own WordPress theme. Grymala will run through a series of functions and features you can use when developing your theme. This session assumes some basic knowledge of PHP and the WordPress theme API.Room 101G20131008T10450020131008T113000Curtiss Grymala (University of Mary Washington)
Podcasts: Building Engagement Outside of the Classroom and Helping Online Students Persist
Podcasts: Building Engagement Outside of the Classroom and Helping Online Students Persist (TIE9)Online adult learners crave an emotional connection with their university, and students who feel connected to their future alma mater are more likely to persist (Rovai 2002). But their time is limited while juggling course work, family, jobs, and more. The key to engagement outside of courses are activities that require little time or effort. Enter podcasts! Adult learners can listen to podcasts on their commute, while they work out, or any time they have a free ear. Penn State World Campus developed a podcast series, PawCast, to foster that emotional connection with students, and to motivate and inspire them to continue their studies. This monthly series brings Penn State's history, tradition, and culture to our adult learners no matter where they are located. Each episode features a different guest or iconic leader from around the university, highlighting events and traditions that Penn Staters hold dear. We also share important updates, Penn State trivia, and tips for academic success. With more than 5,500 downloads in year one, the podcast series has been a success. In this presentation, we will discuss lessons learned and ways we are improving future podcasts using analytics and feedback directly from students.Room 101B20131008T10450020131008T113000Liam Jackson (Penn State), Richard Brungard (Penn State)
Skeuomorphs and Simulacra: The Allure of the Familiar and the Prison of the Past
Skeuomorphs and Simulacra: The Allure of the Familiar and the Prison of the Past (UAD9)In this session, we will explore the concept of the skeuomorph in design and how using representations of familiar objects and materials as affordances in web interfaces can speed the user's grasp of an application's key concepts and features. We’ll look at some fun and illustrative examples and ask if holding too tightly to these kinds of visual metaphors hinders innovation and the development of new paradigms. Pushing beyond buttons and their icons, we’ll talk about the phenomenon where stakeholders visualize their websites through the lens of the physical spaces and administrative procedures they inhabit as they pressure us to design websites that are literal simulations of the way-finding and transactional details of their physical world. A popular and common example of this is a website whose information architecture and navigation mirror a university's organizational structure and floor plan while ignoring user context and principles of task completion. DeMello will talk about how to spot this kind of thinking, its intellectual and emotional causes, and list some strategies for breaking through these patterns. Room 106A20131008T10450020131008T113000David DeMello (Cornell University ILR School)
Accessibility Demystified: Web Accessibility Compliance and Tools to Help Meet the Requirements
Accessibility Demystified: Web Accessibility Compliance and Tools to Help Meet the Requirements (COR9)Having worked for years with higher education organizations to meet WAI/WCAG 2.0 accessibility standards, Penny will educate attendees on web accessibility compliance, standards for higher education, and why web accessibility is everyone’s business. She will discuss the requirements for accessibility and the tools, many of which are free, that are available to help. She will also give recommendations to help organizations get buy-in from their webmasters, marketing teams, and content contributors in order to integrate accessibility considerations into their day-to-day activities campus-wide. She will provide a slide deck for the first part of the presentation, in which she will present the information about accessibility requirements. In the second part of the presentation, she will demonstrate online tools that organizations can use to audit their websites. She will close the presentation by providing electronic resources, such as an accessibility checklist, and opening it up for questions and discussion. Room 101A20131008T10450020131008T113000Penny Kronz (Hannon Hill)
11:45
AM –
12:30
PM
Practical Tips for IA with RWD
Practical Tips for IA with RWD (AIM10)Sure, someone tells your boss to say "Mobile First" but what are the ACTUAL deliverables to the client from an information architecture standpoint? And how can you guide clients to prepare RWD content? This presentation will answer just that with real world examples. Grundy will go through her practical process of planning a responsive site - including client relations, identifying content priorities, wire framing ("mobile first"), demonstrating tools she frequently uses, client content worksheets, and how this process has evolved. This presentation will focus on examples of content requirements, client deliverables and IA workflow, not the theory of why RWD is awesome.Room 101F20131008T11450020131008T123000Julie Grundy (Duke University)
Turn That Job Into a Profession
Turn That Job Into a Profession (MPD10)Putting together 67 years of experience in the IT world and 36 in the world of the web, Sackett and Wagner will pass along the wisdom of the ages so you young whippersnappers can do a better job than they did. A compendium of life lessons as they apply to the job, to help you be proud of what you do (no matter what life stage or job position you are in).Room 106B20131008T11450020131008T123000John Wagner (Princeton University), George Sackett (St. Louis Community College)
Marketing and Web Strategy: Repurposing Traditional Promotions into Innovative Formats
Marketing and Web Strategy: Repurposing Traditional Promotions into Innovative Formats (MCS10)With many schools converting their website into a marketing tool, both marketing and web strategists have questions on how to take traditional promotions and repurpose them into multiple channels throughout their institution’s website. Most higher education institutions have content that can be repurposed into innovative formats for optimal web consumption. Bring together both print and web by repurposing traditional promotions from viewbooks, brochures, post-cards and print ads into pull quotes, emails, videos, etc. Moving forward, education institutions can create stronger campaigns by implementing a unified marketing and web strategy, web trends and ROI.In this presentation, you will learn the formula for and the best practices in taking any traditional promotion and applying it to any school or department website. This presentation will also look at the key factors for creating a unified marketing and web strategy.The presentation will also focus on ideas you can implement right away and strategies you can begin sketching out for future implementation. Marketing and web strategy shouldn’t be intimidating; let this presentation spark the makings for an effective start to your promotional and recruitment goals.Room 101C20131008T11450020131008T123000Jennifer Younker (Saint Xavier University), Romana Amato (Saint Xavier University)
hook_form_alter? I Don't Even Know Her!
hook_form_alter? I Don't Even Know Her! (TPR10)The most important thing your web CMS does is allow people to edit content. If its UI keeps getting in the way, then your frustrated site maintainers will do less maintenance. Fortunately, most systems also have mechanisms for tweaking the UI. This talk will explore a few ways to make edit forms better. Code samples will be mostly in Drupal, but most of the tips can be adapted to other systems.Room 101G20131008T11450020131008T123000Jason Proctor (Mount Holyoke College)
"What did I miss?" How Lecture Capture is Changing the Classroom
"What did I miss?" How Lecture Capture is Changing the Classroom (TIE10)After a two year pilot process of meticulously surveying multiple lecture capture solutions, SUNY Oswego chose a product to implement on campus. In June 2012, a contract was signed with Panopto, and work commenced putting the system in place. In addition to the rooms that already had hardware in place from the evaluation period, the goal was to outfit 10 more rooms for the Fall 2012 semester. With an additional five classrooms outfitted for Spring 2013, the campus now has 20 rooms with Panopto available to record lectures. Come hear how the committee in charge of this process has managed to deploy and administer this system, what pitfalls they have traversed, what faculty feedback has been thus far, how much the system is being utilized by students, and what benefits have been realized. They will also give an overview of how Panopto integrates with ANGEL, as well as examples of lectures faculty have chosen to share with the public.Room 101B20131008T11450020131008T123000Daniel Laird (SUNY Oswego)
The Goal: Data Driven Design
The Goal: Data Driven Design (UAD10)The modern web design fashion is to whole sale redesign when things get stale. Marketing “refreshes” are par for course when people begin talking about “brand identity.” That said, wholesale redesign of site based solely on the opinion of the highest paid person in the room's opinion is fool hearty and can cost visitors, enrollments, and graduating seniors. We're moving towards data driven design and user experience, as much as possible. Starting with setting measurable goals and simple card sorts all the way through to split and multi-variant testing to improve conversions. Motion in this direction is slow, because of constraints of time, people, politics, and last minute projects. We haven't been able to use all our tools on a single project yet, but we hope to eventually make it standard operating procedure. We, as an industry and we as development team, started with using analytics to pat ourselves on the back, and give useless impressive looking numbers to people writing grants and reports. This was and is the most common use of web statistics. A raw number like the number of visitors who visit any site is useless without context, a comparison, a measuring stick, or even a goal to reach. Streich will talk about where analytics started, where we are now, how we got there, and where we want to go. What we have in our favor, what obstacles we overcame, and where we are still fighting ahead.Room 106A20131008T11450020131008T123000Jeremy Streich (UW-Milwaukee)
Web Reboot at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga
Web Reboot at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga (COR10)UTC had a daunting responsive redesign challenge simultaneous with a CMS implementation. With 300 web editors and 10,000 pages of content, the project required strong project management and a lot of negotiation. But through a Web Services partnership that included IT, University Relations, Walker Center for Teaching and Learning, the Library, and OmniUpdate, they successfully tackled this massive website reboot.  During this session, they’ll share their successful project strategies, redesign tips, and the lessons they learned along the way. Room 101A20131008T11450020131008T123000C. Daniel Chase (The University of Tennessee at Chattanooga), Richard Gambrell (University of Tennessee at Chattanooga)
12:30
1:45
PM
Lunch and Association Meeting, sponsored by Hannon Hill (Exhibit Hall)
341481aa-844b-4365-8c60-2931a3353142@2013.highedweb.org 20131008T12300020131008T134500
2:00
2:45
PM
Integrating the Use of Ellucian Luminis Portal with OU Campus
Integrating the Use of Ellucian Luminis Portal with OU Campus (AIM11)The University of Tennessee at Chattanooga uses the Ellucian Luminis portal to allow students access to their data and registration services. Built on the Open Source Liferay portal, it also serves as a central authentication service for other services utilizing it's single-sign-on capabilities. During UTC's upgrade from version four to five of Luminis, Dan Chase investigated deploying static content used in Luminis with OU Campus CMS. While the campus knew allowing department users to edit dedicated special purpose content as they did in version four would be easier in five, campus officials wanted to move editing into the same interface they were using everyday to maintain their website. Doing so also allows better access control, with less complexity. Chase will share the trials & tribulations of what it takes to provide a better services to departmental users, while making the management of those services easier from an information technology perspective.Room 101F20131008T14000020131008T144500C. Daniel Chase (The University of Tennessee at Chattanooga)
Faux Pas, Phonies and Flub-ups: How to Handle Social Media Spoofs, Goofs and Snafus
Faux Pas, Phonies and Flub-ups: How to Handle Social Media Spoofs, Goofs and Snafus (MPD11)OMG! There’s a typo in my post and it already has seven likes and a share. UH-OH! Someone created a phony account for our mascot! YIKES! I just tweeted from Happy Hour – on the College’s account. If you’re human (you are, right?), then that means you’re bound to make a mistake. Don’t beat yourself up about it, kid! In this session, Talarico will fess up about a few of her own minor mistakes and then share how she handled them. She’ll also address parody accounts (and E-town's parody and comment policy) and snarky remarks, as well as address, with permission, spoofs and goofs of a few of her peers. All in all, mistakes are learning opportunities—and that’s what this session is all about!Room 106B20131008T14000020131008T144500Donna Talarico (Elizabethtown College)
Interactive wireframes: kick-start your site strategy
Interactive wireframes: kick-start your site strategy (MCS11)Modeling your site early in live html wireframes helps you to focus your client on their content strategy, allows you to test your IA with users on all devices, and provides a validated model for your themers and developers. Tom Pixton, Communications Specialist, Communication Production Services, MIT, describes his journey from Project Manager of Overly-complicated Academic Websites to Promoter of Guerilla UX/IA for All. Using basic html skills, Pixton builds live models of sites at the beginning of a project that can set the stage for more fruitful collaboration between site owners, designers, developers, and users.Room 101C20131008T14000020131008T144500Tom Pixton (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)
Autoloading PHP with Composer
Autoloading PHP with Composer (TPR11)Composer is a dependency manager for PHP that’s being quickly adopted in the PHP programming community. It allows you to quickly declare and install the dependent libraries your project needs, which means that in just a few steps you can auto-load the code libraries you need for the web application you are building now. In the words of Phil Sturgeon, “Composer is the best thing for PHP since sliced arrays.” In this session Vineyard will show you how to get started with Composer and how to start using it in PHP frameworks you’ve (likely) already used. He will also explain what it means to write PSR-0 compliant PHP code and how Composer and Packagist together, as a dependency management system, differ from PEAR, PHP’s older packaging system. If you happen to dabble in other programming languages, you’ll find that Composer is strongly inspired by node's npm and ruby's bundler.Room 101G20131008T14000020131008T144500Zac Vineyard (Northwest Nazarene University)
Canary in the Coal Mine of Online Learning
Canary in the Coal Mine of Online Learning (TIE11)If you work in higher education, it is hard to avoid the hype surrounding MOOCs (massive open online courses) during the last couple of years. Just what is all the hype about? In this presentation, Lori Packer will discuss her experiences going from Web professional to student in MOOCs from Coursera and Udacity, and a "traditional" Blackboard-driven graduate program and will ask several questions. How do MOOCs compare to other online experiences? How does technology help or impede the learning process? Is a "classroom" of thousands really a classroom? How does the role of a professor change in this environment? The role of a student? When on-campus students are paying $6,000 to take the same 3-credit class that thousands of students are taking for free, what value is being added for the on-campus student, and does that added value worth the cost? Are these developments in massive online courses exciting? Alarming? Both?   Room 101B20131008T14000020131008T144500Lori Packer (University of Rochester)
The Nittany Leopard: How Usability Testing Informed the Penn State Website Redesign
The Nittany Leopard: How Usability Testing Informed the Penn State Website Redesign (UAD11)For the first time in over a decade, Penn State University launched a full website redesign in February 2013. A team assembled from various departments across the University worked to incorporate a wide range of research, user feedback, and usability testing into the redesign. Led by Sara Simcox, Penn State’s Assistant Director of Research and Planning, and Dave Housley, Manager of Web Strategy for Penn State Outreach, this presentation steps through the way research informed each phase of this process, including benchmarking, analytics, usability testing, card sorting, testing and analysis of the various elements of the feature "slider" area in order to optimize the level of user engagement, clicktracking tests on wireframes and design comps, "live wireframe" testing, and post-launch testing and analysis. This presentation will share the unexpected and anticipated results, along with follow-up actions, through development and after site launch. We'll share testing goals, methods, and analysis, with an eye toward what attendees may want to bring back to their own work. Attendees will gain a greater understanding of usability testing and the manner in which results can be applied throughout the process of website development and even after a site launch, as well as a feel for the range of affordable usability testing resources that are available.Room 106A20131008T14000020131008T144500Dave Housley (Penn State Outreach Marketing)
HighEdWeb and Educause Apps - 'Powered by campusM': The Mobile Platform of Choice for Education
HighEdWeb and Educause Apps - 'Powered by campusM': The Mobile Platform of Choice for Education (COR11)campusM, the UK's market leading mobile platform in Higher Education has been selected to provide the conference app for the HighEdWeb and Educause Annual Conferences. This session will demonstrate the features of campusM and show how simple it is to deliver flexible apps and responsive web for all communities - from students and faculty, to prospects, alumni, and visitors. You'll see just how easy it is to deliver a world-class mobile presence for your University on leading platforms and devices. Room 101A20131008T14000020131008T144500David Stephenson (oMbiel)
3:00
3:45
PM
ResourceSpace Digital Asset Management System
ResourceSpace Digital Asset Management System (AIM12)Digital assets are playing an increasingly important role in institutions. Saginaw Valley State University (SVSU) now has a collection that includes 1.5TB of photos, 7TB of videos, and hundreds of thousands of internal documents and publications. And SVSU is not unique in this aspect. Digital Assets are growing at an exponential number and there needs to be a way to index and retrieve all of these assets. ResourceSpace allows users to submit resources in a variety of ways, automatically converts resources into formats that users can use with their default software, and allows for administrators to easily catalog and index the resources for the users to find, with a minimal amount of effort. The first phase of implementation of ResourceSpace at SVSU started with archiving the university’s 500,000 photos. The second phase included setting up workflows to catalog and index the documents required for the mandated HLC accreditation. And the third phase set up a public facing catalog for the University’s publications. In this presentation, Maturen will walk an audience through the steps of installing ResourceSpace; configuring workflows for groups, users, and resources; and introduce the audience to the built in plugin system and how to maintain an updatable core system. ResourceSpace is created with common methods including PHP and MySQL while leveraging open source libraries to handle lower level tasks.Room 101F20131008T15000020131008T154500Aaron Maturen (SVSU)
Stand Back....I'm Going To Try Science!
Stand Back....I'm Going To Try Science! (MPD12)Everyone loves data, but few people really understand how to collect it in a way that will stand up to scrutiny of your boss, your colleagues and....worst of all....any faculty members that you may need to convince. Fear not, help has arrived. In this session, Karlyn Borysenko will give you a crash course in everything you need to learn to conduct and communicate research about the wants, needs and behaviors of your audience that even the most stubborn faculty and administers won't be able to question. We'll cover both quantitative and qualitative research topics and discuss a basic framework for how and when to use both, drawing from real-world higher ed marketing and web examples. You'll leave the session with a core understanding of how to walk the walk AND talk the talk of research and data to drive your marketing and usability decisions.Room 106B20131008T15000020131008T154500Karlyn Borysenko (Eduventures)
Transform the Trivial: Reasons to cut basic tech support from your "to do" list
Transform the Trivial: Reasons to cut basic tech support from your "to do" list (MCS12)Addressing the issues of an academic website is not always a matter of man-hours or system enhancements; sometimes all a site needs to thrive is a shift in philosophy. Over the past year, the McCombs web team created a leaner, easier-to-navigate site not by employing new technology, but by removing themselves from outdated roles. The changes in the website’s functionality and usability corresponded with several self-imposed shifts in the web team’s job description:• Remove web team’s role in basic CMS training • Place responsibility of creating high-quality content on the users • Focus web team efforts on technical innovation rather than basic updates and maintenance • Brand web team as consultants rather than support staff • Encourage users to teach themselves the basics, and encourage users to help other usersIn our presentation, we’ll show how a group of 5 individuals on the first floor (read: basement) of The University of Texas at Austin’s business school--within a single year and without additional funding--was able to:• Dramatically enhance their site’s user experience • Increase the web-savvy of students, faculty, and staff • Eliminate bottlenecks in workflow • Become a model for other schools within the UT system. We’ll also illustrate how others can achieve similar results simply by redefining what a “web team” does and doesn’t do.Room 101C20131008T15000020131008T154500Jennifer Chance (University of Texas at Austin), Mark Foster (University of Texas at Austin)
DIY CONTINUOUS INTEGRATION
DIY CONTINUOUS INTEGRATION (TPR12)You know what Continuous Integration is. You have heard it mentioned at every conference and at every meetup. It’s part automated testing, part automated deployment, part test-driven development, part every other DevOps catch-phrase. Now you are ready to get started implementing CI practices. This session has three goals:1.) explain what continuous integration means relative to web development, using Drupal as a test case.2.) Introduce the tools available to implement CI now.3.) Demonstrate what a CI implementation looks like in practice.This session will explore what Continuous Integration is and is not with step by step examples and a DIY kit to get you exploring more. Continuous Integration touches all parties: clients, project managers, system admins, and developers, front and back end. If that’s you, you need to know what CI is.Room 101G20131008T15000020131008T154500Michelle Krejci (Promet Source)
[Insert joke here] The serious business of injecting comedy and humour into higher ed content
[Insert joke here] The serious business of injecting comedy and humour into higher ed content (TIE12)From the land that bought the extremes of silly and serious from Fawlty Towers to Monty Python to Mister Bean, from the jet engine to the Worldwide web to the light bulb. Tracy Playle joins us with her own very British sense of humour to ask the question: can we ever really unleash a sense of humour on the serious business of higher education marketing? The HighEdWeb crowd all know that some of the most engaging social and digital content is that which injects a few LOLs and ROFLs into our lives. But 'funny' doesn't sit comfortably with the often very serious culture of universities. Throw in the fairly reserved culture of the British higher education system, and we find ourselves more "hmm" than "ha". So, can comedy really be deployed as part of a strategy that needs to deliver a serious message? What do we need to happen and change within our universities to make this happen? Do we need our external audiences to shift their perceptions of us too, or will those perceptions serve to heighten the impact of humorous content in our online activities? In this fast paced session we'll think about what works when we deploy comedy for communications and look at other serious sectors that have done this well.Room 101B20131008T15000020131008T154500Tracy Playle (Pickle Jar Communications)
Get Started with Accessibility
Get Started with Accessibility (UAD12)Accessibility has been an issue for over a decade, and it remains a critical—yet often neglected—part of managing a website. Kevin Rydberg explains accessibility as it applies to your site, and shows how it affects your audience. Rydberg will demonstrate devices used by people with disabilities and show the Web from their point-of-view. Kevin will also provide ideas to help get started with an accessibility strategy. He then covers how to apply these principles to new and existing sites. There are a few technical details, but not focused on that aspect. One of the biggest hurdles is just getting started. Our purpose is to introduce attendees to a general description of Web accessibility. Another purpose is to illustrate its importance by demonstrating how people with disabilities access the Web. Session attendees will be able to take away some ideas on starting or prioritizing a Web accessibility initiative in their organization.  Room 106A20131008T15000020131008T154500Kevin Rydberg (Siteimprove, inc.)
Rethinking Your Online Forms: No Assembly Required
Rethinking Your Online Forms: No Assembly Required (COR12)Forms can be awful and annoying — but they can also become powerful tools for any organization. If you create, need, or are just plain interested in web forms and data collection practices, this session's for you!   Since the FormAssembly team got started in 2006, they've learned a few things about building forms and the challenges that higher ed organizations face when dealing with forms and data collection.   In this session, the team will share higher ed case studies and discuss common issues around usability, feature set, flexibility, security, and privacy. They'll also explore how to prevent bottlenecks by delegating form creation and the importance of integration with your organization's information systems.    Afterward, the team will take a few minutes to demonstrate how FormAssembly can help you and your organization rethink your forms. Room 101A20131008T15000020131008T154500Cedric Savarese (FormAssembly), Jaret Manuel (FormAssembly)
3:45
5:15
PM
Poster Sessions
@2013.highedweb.org 20131008T15450020131008T171500
3:45
5:15
PM
Refreshment Break (Ballroom)
42426f92-4f28-481a-9169-a00ab67e4aee@2013.highedweb.org 20131008T15450020131008T171500
6:30
10:30
PM
Excursion at Asbury Hall (Asbury Hall, 341 Delaware Ave.)
fb626759-2217-468b-b5e0-8efa84abbfe7@2013.highedweb.org Excursion at Asbury HallCelebrate HighEdWeb in style at Asbury Hall — aka “Babeville,” located in downtown Buffalo and home to Ani DiFranco’s Righteous Babe records. Spend the evening munching, enjoying great local music, and visiting with friends new and old.20131008T18300020131008T223000

Wednesday, October 9

Applications, Integration and Mobile Management and Professional Development Marketing, Content, and Social Strategy Technical: Propeller Hats Required Technology in Education Usability, Accessibility and Design
7:30
8:45
AM
Breakfast, sponsored by OmniUpdate (Exhibit Hall)
1ea3af68-c96e-431c-9611-c04e6d8b8718@2013.highedweb.org 20131009T07300020131009T084500
7:30
8:45
AM
Registration (Lobby)
7d7ff592-b4fc-471c-905a-151ca1305bf1@2013.highedweb.org 20131009T07300020131009T084500
8:30
8:45
AM
Red Stapler Announcement (Exhibit Hall)
df85b87d-c4a0-4b52-b590-62280e6008d2@2013.highedweb.org 20131009T08300020131009T084500
9:00
9:45
AM
Red Stapler (Best of Track)
The On-Ramp to a Successful Responsive Workflow
The On-Ramp to a Successful Responsive Workflow ()The three main spokes in the wheel of Responsive Web Design are content, design, and development. Chances are you're not an expert at all three. The fact that you "get" RWD doesn't ensure your web projects' success. Many different people have a stake in the success of a web design project: content writers, information architects, graphic designers, front-end coders, back-end coders -- the list could go on. It's time to get everyone on the same page. It's time to create a better workflow. In this session, we'll discuss some ways to educate your team on the principles of Responsive Web Design and how this newly-acquired knowledge should naturally translate into finding better ways of doing your work; specifically, what your new responsive workflow might look like - by showing examples of how several web teams and industry experts are tackling this issue. Finally, we'll talk about how to foster continual innovation and education so that your team keeps pace with the speed of the web.Room 101F20131009T09000020131009T094500Peter Anglea (Bob Jones University)
Lessons Learned from a Lockdown: Using the Web and Social Media in a Crisis
Lessons Learned from a Lockdown: Using the Web and Social Media in a Crisis ()On a bright Thursday morning in April 2013, the University of Rhode Island went from calm to calamitous in an instant when a report went out that there was a man with a gun in a full lecture hall. The campus went into lockdown with 300 students locked out. Twenty thousand scared people (and their families across the globe) wondered what was going on, looked to URI for answers, and filled in gaps in information with their own versions of what they'd heard from their roommate's cousin's friend's brother. Cindy Sabato and Kerri Hicks will deliver some real-life lessons learned that day – and in its aftermath – about communicating online during a crisis. Everyone expects your website to hold all the answers they're looking for, but in a crisis, will your website be able to carry the load? We'll offer some simple (and extravagant) changes you can make to ensure your site is as stable as it can be during an emergency. We'll cover the value of making your social media leader a part of the crisis team, show examples of why even great social media communication isn't enough for some, and share a few chuckle-worthy moments of a community saying what you want to, but can't. And finally, some people aren't looking to social media or the web at all. We'll talk about how an emergency alert system can undermine the credibility of your communication response, and the pros and cons of having multiple messengers and tools.Room 106B20131009T09000020131009T094500Cindy Sabato, APR (University of Rhode Island), Kerri Hicks (University of Rhode Island)
Stay Ahead of the Curve: Conducting a Competitive Web Content Analysis
Stay Ahead of the Curve: Conducting a Competitive Web Content Analysis ()In order to make informed decisions about your website, you need an understanding of what content you have and whether or not it’s any good. Hello, content audit! But how do you know if your findings are appropriate, if your recommendations will work, and if your new-and-improved content will put you ahead of the competition? Hello, competitive analysis! A competitive analysis of web content is an assessment of competing websites based on your content goals. Your assessment criteria might include branding, usability, accessibility, information architecture, or any other element of your web content strategy. In this session, learn how to evaluate what web elements work well for other higher ed institutions, what problems you want to avoid, and how you can innovate. There are many examples of great content in higher ed, but there are just as many examples of poor quality content. A competitive analysis will help you stay on the winning side.Room 101C20131009T09000020131009T094500Rick Allen (Meet Content)
Placemarks to the people
Placemarks to the people ()Buildings and parking aren't the only locations that people need to find on your campus. Why then, are they the only items marked on your maps? The technology to create beautiful, interactive maps has been around for a while. Unfortunately, many colleges choose to only include a limited amount of information. Often, it’s not a technological hurdle, but instead a content issue. Let’s solve this by distributing the ability to add items to the map.In this 45 minute session, I will show you how to set up your own platform to collect and maintain user generated map content. It’s a lot easier than you might think. In just the past year, our maps have been extended to include campus artwork, sustainability highlights and thousands of accessibility features.Given the power, what would your users add to the map?Room 101G20131009T09000020131009T094500Gabriel Nagmay (Portland Community College)
Blog Me Baby One More Time
Blog Me Baby One More Time ()Can blogging really make a difference to a student’s academic experience? Is there any real value to maintaining a blog? Can we prove there is value added to the educational experience? You bet there is, because we’ve studied it! In general English classes, blogs have been used to encourage engagement with other students, increasing the quality of writing and discourse in the classroom. In a basic nutrition course, students create content for general publication and engage deeper with the material to gain a greater understanding of their chosen topics. In composition classes, students who blogged had almost double the success in getting a paper published in a reviewed journal, either as is or with only minor revisions. (We even have the data to prove it!) In our Year Abroad programs, student blogs put it all together -- documenting their travels, providing geographic and cultural touchpoints for students and instructors back in the campus classroom, and provide some of the best marketing material the department has ever seen, all in the authentic student voice. Instructors are finding real value in these blogging initiatives and often, when they try it in one course, are anxious to integrate blogs into other classes as well. So don’t knock the blog -- in fact, promote it. It does a student good.Room 101B20131009T09000020131009T094500Robin Smail (Firebrand Tribe), Audrey Romano (Penn State University)
Creating a “Responsive” Web Community on Campus
Creating a “Responsive” Web Community on Campus ()Have you been asked to do more with less? Do you wish Web issues could be coordinated better across your campus? Are you trying to push out a responsive/mobile strategy across your Web systems? If you answered yes to any of these questions, you are facing the same challenges as many other institutions. Shrinking resources, expanded Web services, and the mobile movement are creating problems for institutions of all sizes. Utah Valley University is facing all of these challenges. Through their move to responsive design, however, they have uncovered a secret gem weaved throughout their institution: a community of Web content contributors, site managers, and developers eager to pitch in and be part of the solution. Using their responsive Web design project, their current CMS tools, and a communications plan, they have tapped this vast community resource to help move the Web effort forward on campus. Come learn how to stimulate your Web community on campus by focusing CMS efforts to be user-centric rather than developer-focused, how to leverage the energy around mobile and RWD to your resource advantage, and how to create a two-way communications plan that engages Web users across your campus. Room 106A20131009T09000020131009T094500Nathan Gerber (Utah Valley University)
9:45
10:00
AM
Refreshment Break (Ballroom)
bffee57a-7228-46e8-b5bd-8cf5080ed972@2013.highedweb.org 20131009T09450020131009T100000
10:00
10:30
AM
Awards and Recognitions including Best of Conference Award
0ff6533e-666d-40ba-9119-62b91a4b6797@2013.highedweb.org 20131009T10000020131009T103000
10:30
11:30
AM
General Session
Scott Stratten
Author, speaker, preacher and president of Un-Marketing
20131009T103000 20131009T113000 Scott Stratten
11:30
AM –
12:00
PM
Book signing with Scott Stratten (Exhibit Hall)
112ead6d-340b-488a-8f83-0f720911331f@2013.highedweb.org 20131009T11300020131009T120000
11:30
AM –
1:00
PM
Lunch (Exhibit Hall)
fda0da5f-455f-407c-bf61-7eb136a6b6f1@2013.highedweb.org 20131009T11300020131009T130000
11:30
AM –
1:00
PM
Registration (Lobby)
0625c687-f606-4d59-a2a6-272078d8bd3b@2013.highedweb.org 20131009T11300020131009T130000
1:00
4:30
PM
Workshops
A Content-First Approach to Web Usability
A Content-First Approach to Web Usability (WRK7)Usability is an abstract concept. What does it mean to have a usable website, and how do you plan for it? Most people think about usability as a design concern—that it involves outfitting their site with compelling graphics, prominent calls-to-action, legible fonts, and so on—but while design enhances usability, it can't provide a solution. Just like you can't effectively design a website without content, you can't design for usability without a content strategy. A content-first approach to usability will help you address users' needs with considerations for what information they seek, how they seek it, and how they use it—all while supporting your brand and institutional website goals. In this workshop, learn how elements of content strategy—including information architecture, content modeling, messaging and editorial style, taxonomy and metadata, and user research—allow us to plan, create, and maintain usable websites and rewarding user experiences. About the presenter: Rick Allen has worked in higher education for more than twelve years helping to shape web communications and content strategy. As co-founder of Meet Content, an online resource dedicated to content strategy in higher education, Allen works with higher ed organizations to create, publish, and govern effective web content.Room 106A20131009T13000020131009T163000Rick Allen (Meet Content)
Data-driven Interactives with D3.js
Data-driven Interactives with D3.js (WRK9)Yes, you can deliver rich, interactive, highly designed experiences without Flash. NewCity developer John Williams walks you through some of the more interesting JavaScript-based charting libraries, then focuses on the most flexible of the lot: D3.js. A relatively recent addition, D3.js is the successor to Protoviz. It has broad browser support and can manipulate both HTML and SVG-based DOMs. Far more than just a charting library, D3.js brings the data-driven, highly-designable interactive capability to the native browser. Over the course of this tutorial, Williams will demonstrate actual public uses of D3.js, then walk you through the basic concepts and structures you need to know to get started with the library.Room 101B20131009T13000020131009T163000John Williams (NewCity)
Fix All The (Map) Data! Building an Interactive Campus Map
Fix All The (Map) Data! Building an Interactive Campus Map (WRK10)Campus Mapping: so many data sources, competing services, and oh so many pieces of data to correct. We'll first look at common systems (Google MapMaker, OpenStreetMap, and NavTeq MapReporter) with which errors about your campus physical plant can be corrected - and then work through the process of building an interactive campus map using Leaflet.js, a few plugins, and a combination of those data sources (fairly) easily for your own campus. Workshop will require at least a working knowledge of JavaScript.SUNY-ESF has been exploring various means of using external map data to offer a strong campus map for several years, and rapid changes to the physical plant of their Syracuse campus have required learning how to get changes made to services like Google Maps so that campus visitors are well-directed to campus.Room 101C20131009T13000020131009T163000Aaron Knight (SUNY-ESF)
Inbound, Outbound, and All Around: Content Marketing
Inbound, Outbound, and All Around: Content Marketing (WRK11)This session will cover both the “inbound” and “outbound” components of a modern-day content marketing strategy—from SEO, content creation, social media, email marketing and landing pages to paid advertising, direct mail, cold calling, email lists and tradeshows. Hannon Hill CEO Kat Liendgens will discuss the value of being agile and adaptive and talk about the best ways to measure your success and continually improve your content, without losing your mind! This session is meant to help anyone with a marketing or communications-related position at a university feel both inspired and empowered to amplify their content!Room 101G20131009T13000020131009T163000Kat Liendgens (Hannon Hill)
Is my .edu accessible?
Is my .edu accessible? (WRK12)Learn how to test your web sites/applications for accessibility from Glenda (the @goodwitch) Sims. Whether you want to comply with 508, WCAG 2.0 A or WCAG 2.0 AA, Glenda will show you how to use automated tools and manual testing techniques. This hands-on accessibility testing workshop will focus on free tools and techniques that you can use today and share with your colleagues. And rather than just a demo, you will roll up your sleeves and practice testing sites of your choosing. Come with your laptop and the following software installed (to be best prepared to get the most out of this workshop): * Firefox * FireBug Tools we will use during class include: * WAVE Toolbar * Web Developer Toolbar * Juicy Studio Accessibility Toolbar * Firefox Accessibility Extension * HeadingsMap * Deque FireEyes Testing techniques covered will be Alt, Forms, Multimedia, Semantics, Reading Order, Color Contrast, Keyboard Access, Dynamic ContentRoom 106B20131009T13000020131009T163000Glenda Sims (Deque)

Heweb Connect

Twitter Facebook Blog LinkedIn Youtube Flickr Twibbon Instagram

#heweb13 Tweets

#heweb on Flickr

See all photos